Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Kath
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Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

Post by Kath »

Stop right there!
I know most "systems" claim to be ancient, usually far more ancient than they in fact are (particularly in western esoteria).
I'm not talking about heavily codified stuff in common circulation.
And there is plenty from other cultures which is very popularized in the west, so much so that it's not really 'novel' to western culture anymore.

But I mean, a lot of what's popular is based on other popular works. The popular systems don't exist in a vacuum independently from one another really. Thus the rough parameters of the eastern & western esoteric, which come in various flavors, but contain many of the same eastern or western ideas. So they tend to have a lot of base assumptions which are all the same.

Meanwhile, studying something like indonesian magic, or uh... khemetic, not modern stuff which claims to be ancient egyptian based, but actual content from the period (and yeah, unfortunately there's a difference).

Or how about babylonian or sumerian? And I don't mean through the lens of a renaissance-era penned grimoire.

Or greek, wow there's so much from archaic greece which has not survived into modern magical pop culture.

I like some of the more accessible stuff too, vedas, tantra, chinese, japanese, tibetian, neijia, thelma, chaos, etc. lots of good stuff out there which is popular.
But I mean, I find that the further you get from the widely distributed stuff, the more interesting the insights.
Not because the insights are 'better', but because they're more unfamiliar, I find they speak more thoughtfully to broadening one's perspective.

anybody else?

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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I have personal dogma that everything that came out "post flood" and/or from the areas that were "flooded" is not clean enough to be ingested. Which actually leaves very little to work with. There are almost no surviving authentic ancient Celtic, Greek or Kemetic texts. Which don't seem to be a a problem for a number of new age spiritualism groups to claim ancient roots, connections and knowledge of ancient secret European cultures.
Chinese went through a moment or personal collective madness of "cultural revolution", aka "book burning fiesta".
That kind of leaves the only two places still authentic to their ancient tradition, at least to significant degree - India and Japan. Everything else is flooded . In my personal gnosis at least.
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Perhaps the coming of Aquarius means a new bottle for new wine.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Cerber wrote: Mon Jan 25, 2021 2:17 am I have personal dogma that everything that came out "post flood" and/or from the areas that were "flooded" is not clean enough to be ingested. Which actually leaves very little to work with. There are almost no surviving authentic ancient Celtic, Greek or Kemetic texts. Which don't seem to be a a problem for a number of new age spiritualism groups to claim ancient roots, connections and knowledge of ancient secret European cultures.
Chinese went through a moment or personal collective madness of "cultural revolution", aka "book burning fiesta".
That kind of leaves the only two places still authentic to their ancient tradition, at least to significant degree - India and Japan. Everything else is flooded . In my personal gnosis at least.
Hmmmm, that's a very interesting answer.

I do agree that the practices and beliefs which were "lost to time" are indeed far more incomplete. However, personally I usually kinda skim past the dogma and window dressing anyway. It's the fundamental principals & concepts which catch my eye. Whether ideas are true or untrue is not easily defined, even with very extensive resources. So really I guess it's more about the utility of the ideas, either directly, or philosophically/paradigmatically. I find that a surprising amount of conceptual ideas can be intuited from a fairly limited body of resources. But it's rarely a complete set of ideas.

It's annoying how things get lost to time. Everything ultimately. But then if change was not a fundamental constant, it would be a boring multiverse.

Heh, like I'm any better. I love to learn so much, but you can only usually learn something once. If I move through time consuming novel experiences like that... burying the past with my own shovel too. I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

When I was a small child, I think my best friend was the family dog. And when I learned of mortality, I became afraid to enjoy my time with him. And when he did die, I had a lot of regret. I vowed that I would not fail to enjoy the present again. I haven't always kept that vow. And sometimes I still question the meaningfulness of transient things, even though I know meaning falls on our own shoulders. But it's always enjoyable to help others enjoy the present..
And always the sensation that I've forgotten something extraordinarily important. that is definitely related.
Sorry, I got off topic really rapidly there. A thread of thought took a sharp turn and strayed near the theme of my story. Couldn't really ignore that.

Interesting use of the term flooded.

New ideas are interesting too :)
though i'd differentiate between new ideas and "new age" ideas.
I don't really get into "new age" ideas. Not to any significant degree anyway. So full of the "I want to believe" vibe. And while I think it's fully on the individual to create meaning in the universe, wanting to believe things is more making up realities than experiencing and interpreting them. In a way it's shunning reality in favor of imagination. Even if i cherish creativity, it's not really my cup of tea to mingle fantasy and reality. It seems a little disrespectful to reality.

I think the ancient egyptians had interesting ideas on the nature of divinity, and of the soul. The greeks, interesting ideas on the nature of the self, and of the supernatural in general. Indonesia, the nature of energy flows. South central and south east asia, the nature of enlightenment. etc. Although that last is more popularized in print, often the print kinda skims over or poorly addresses the key bits. I guess I have a somewhat hybridized view of things. Although there are echoes of rather similar ideas in multiple sources out there.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Kath wrote: Mon Jan 25, 2021 7:53 pm
Hmmmm, that's a very interesting answer.

I do agree that the practices and beliefs which were "lost to time" are indeed far more incomplete. However, personally I usually kinda skim past the dogma and window dressing anyway. It's the fundamental principals & concepts which catch my eye. Whether ideas are true or untrue is not easily defined, even with very extensive resources. So really I guess it's more about the utility of the ideas, either directly, or philosophically/paradigmatically. I find that a surprising amount of conceptual ideas can be intuited from a fairly limited body of resources. But it's rarely a complete set of ideas.

It's annoying how things get lost to time. Everything ultimately. But then if change was not a fundamental constant, it would be a boring multiverse.

Heh, like I'm any better. I love to learn so much, but you can only usually learn something once. If I move through time consuming novel experiences like that... burying the past with my own shovel too. I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

When I was a small child, I think my best friend was the family dog. And when I learned of mortality, I became afraid to enjoy my time with him. And when he did die, I had a lot of regret. I vowed that I would not fail to enjoy the present again. I haven't always kept that vow. And sometimes I still question the meaningfulness of transient things, even though I know meaning falls on our own shoulders. But it's always enjoyable to help others enjoy the present..
And always the sensation that I've forgotten something extraordinarily important. that is definitely related.
Sorry, I got off topic really rapidly there. A thread of thought took a sharp turn and strayed near the theme of my story. Couldn't really ignore that.

Interesting use of the term flooded.

New ideas are interesting too :)
though i'd differentiate between new ideas and "new age" ideas.
I don't really get into "new age" ideas. Not to any significant degree anyway. So full of the "I want to believe" vibe. And while I think it's fully on the individual to create meaning in the universe, wanting to believe things is more making up realities than experiencing and interpreting them. In a way it's shunning reality in favor of imagination. Even if i cherish creativity, it's not really my cup of tea to mingle fantasy and reality. It seems a little disrespectful to reality.

I think the ancient egyptians had interesting ideas on the nature of divinity, and of the soul. The greeks, interesting ideas on the nature of the self, and of the supernatural in general. Indonesia, the nature of energy flows. South central and south east asia, the nature of enlightenment. etc. Although that last is more popularized in print, often the print kinda skims over or poorly addresses the key bits. I guess I have a somewhat hybridized view of things. Although there are echoes of rather similar ideas in multiple sources out there.
I don't think the old ideas were lost, at least not fundamentals. Fundamental knowledge were spread, seeded far and wide, and were/are continuously being "re-seeded". Those pop up all around, in expected and even most unexpected places, in different many teachings, in stories, even pop culture. You'll notice those grain of knowledge in wide range of mediums, if you keep your mind open, from fairy tales, and songs, to more modern mediums like tv shows and even computer games. "Hidden" in plain sight. Constantly being reintroduced intentionally or subconsciously in to stories, new contents, new mediums by every new generation. We may have lost some different takes, flavours, angles of certain knowledge, but the angles they were looking at something millennia ago was fine for there and then and not very useful for here and now, and our angles of here and now might be completely unusable for them back then and there. I think it's mostly fine. As long as no one managed to burn completely all the books at once everywhere. And occasional acts of regional pyromania, only set back certain region of human collective by few centuries, but not the entirety of it, and those part eventually catch up with the rest, eventually, usually. Still annoying as hell, but in the grand scheme of things, it's fine, mostly. Most of the damage mainly just sentimental. At least that's the way I see it.
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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If you think of paradigms as framing ideas which surround and warp a perception of reality in various ways ...and if you think of paradigm shift as a very useful thing in the ways it illuminates the lenses which shape our perception ...then the more removed the paradigm (from the commonly known), the more illuminating it can be, in this way.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Kath wrote: Wed Jan 27, 2021 2:09 am If you think of paradigms as framing ideas which surround and warp a perception of reality in various ways ...and if you think of paradigm shift as a very useful thing in the ways it illuminates the lenses which shape our perception ...then the more removed the paradigm (from the commonly known), the more illuminating it can be, in this way.
Hmmm no, I think of paradigm as a lens which focuses some very blurry "out focus" abstract idea, aspect, truth, in to something at least somewhat conceivable by our limited human mind. Allows us to grasp it. And shifting paradigms only shift the angle a little from which we get to look at the same thing. Which is good, things look different depending on the angle we look at it. And after experiencing, observing, seeing something from few different angles/paradigms gives us, potentially, ability to finally reach certain depth of understanding of certain abstract concept/aspect, after which we don't need any paradigms any more, we become able to feel it, contemplate it, incorporate it, work with it, as it is from any and all possible angles at all time without anyone and anything guiding our hands and minds - potentially, ideally. At least that's the angle I see it from.
In other words, I see different paradigms more like a walking canes, than a restrains.
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Cerber wrote: Wed Jan 27, 2021 3:16 am
Kath wrote: Wed Jan 27, 2021 2:09 am If you think of paradigms as framing ideas which surround and warp a perception of reality in various ways ...and if you think of paradigm shift as a very useful thing in the ways it illuminates the lenses which shape our perception ...then the more removed the paradigm (from the commonly known), the more illuminating it can be, in this way.
Hmmm no, I think of paradigm as a lens which focuses some very blurry "out focus" abstract idea, aspect, truth, in to something at least somewhat conceivable by our limited human mind. Allows us to grasp it. And shifting paradigms only shift the angle a little from which we get to look at the same thing. Which is good, things look different depending on the angle we look at it. And after experiencing, observing, seeing something from few different angles/paradigms gives us, potentially, ability to finally reach certain depth of understanding of certain abstract concept/aspect, after which we don't need any paradigms any more, we become able to feel it, contemplate it, incorporate it, work with it, as it is from any and all possible angles at all time without anyone and anything guiding our hands and minds - potentially, ideally. At least that's the angle I see it from.
In other words, I see different paradigms more like a walking canes, than a restrains.
I guess what I mean is that no paradigms are perfect, all warp what is seen. But by looking into a wide variety of funhouse mirrors of reality, you can kinda start to build a mental understanding of the raw original un-warped thing.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Kath wrote: Mon Feb 01, 2021 6:52 pm I guess what I mean is that no paradigms are perfect, all warp what is seen. But by looking into a wide variety of funhouse mirrors of reality, you can kinda start to build a mental understanding of the raw original un-warped thing.
I believe paradigms cannot be perfect, never meant to be, perfect paradigms are impossible. Even if one managed to achieve "near-perfect" understand of some concept, one will never be able to present his/her understand in "perfect manner", they would merely creating yet another imperfect paradigm. At least the way I see it, it's like a one flatlander trying to explain what is a sphere to another flatlander by drawing a flat circles, there is never a "perfect" ways in such "near-impossible" tasks.
So I see paradigms as breadcrumbs guiding towards some deeper understanding, never meant to be or imply any perfection. "Perfection" implies some finish line, some end goal, as if there is a point when one can actually "know it all" and there is no more knowledge and deeper understanding to gain beyond such point. I personally don't believe such limits, but I do believe in "points" after which acquired knowledge and understanding can be sufficient for the given time and place and a person in question.
Many of those ancient paradigms, both western and eastern (excluding Abrahamic traditions (I completely reject those and all other new age (past 2000-3000 years is all "new age" for me))), share all the same concepts, differences are usually minor and only due to environmental and cultural variation, not because of one group of people has some fundamental knowledge that the other one do not. At least to me eye.
Japanese Shinto tradition still believes all things have spirit, Kami, but so did ancient European pagans, Celts, and American tribes, before those were "enlightened by the wisdom of the christ". It's just that very few of those ancient traditions got to grow and evolve a bit for past few millennia, while most were savagely cut down in their youth...
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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I posted a great ancient cross cultural technique. Its titled primordial magick. Check it out! Its in same category as yours. Truth is imo there is no technique like it in the entire world because the powers that be hid all the truth. But the truth has been restored from new ancient temples being uncovered. Putting many puzzle pieces together across the world. I don't take credit for it but hilton hotema, theoria, and damo mitchel. I just put them together so we can all see the big picture.

99% of all biology and physics is false. But the truth is out there if you look hard enough. As for metaphysics. Every belief system has part of the truth hidden in metaphors. I'm tempted to make a book containing them all. You see before the great flood was know as the golden age where people lived 1000 years +. They had the complete truth. When it flooded some of the atlanteans escaped death and hid in the himalaya mountains and past on the secrets. Over time due to pride, greed, and wars ect The truth was hidden and destroyed. Ancient symbols hide the truth in them so the truth suppressors overlook them and dont destroy them.

The most ancient religions are the zodiac and the tarot that we know of. Both teach you the life principle and how to perfect your body, mind and soul. For example the lovers card in tarot shows a lady guiding a man down 2 paths. 1 to the city of life and the other to the city of death. This is a metaphor not to have sex or masturbate too much. You see not expelling your seed of life is hidden in just about every belief system in metaphors. When any lower lifeform has sex it immediatly dies or is close to death. Even bigger animals like rabbits and boars can die having sex. horses eyes will roll in the back of their heads and fall over. Their lifeforce is immense so they dont die tho. Having sex depletes your mana through the sympathatic nervous system response. We store a lot mana the same way eels do in lecithin which makes up a large quantity of semen. When conserved and reversed it will go into the blood stream then in the spinal fluid to the heads pineal gland and turn into the golden elixir. This charges the pituatary gland which discharges against the dormant pineal. When this happens you will see a light in your head and this is enlightenment. The reason you see a light is because the pineal has magnetite in it and creates a large magnetic field when its regenerated. A magnetic field is the only thing that can stir the aether and produce light. After some time the light will condense into a ball then turn into dots of light like stars. This indicates that the dormant cerebellum is waking up. Humans use 10% of their brain they say but when the 3rd eye awakens they can use 100% you will get smarter. Becuase your body is a antenae for the soul which is in the aether and is god the cosmic will. You will be able to contain more soul. The soul is pure information memories. So you get a lot smarter. You will know things you never learned before.

I love teaching people and i could prolly go on and on lool but ill leave it at that. I'd love to add you and facebook if you willing to learn but idk if its allowed to post our contact info here. Im new to this site.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Flowing Hands wrote: Wed Jul 20, 2022 9:59 pm 99% of all biology and physics is false..
I'm on the opposite camp. In my books, 99% of it is more or less accurate, the remaining 1% is a work in progress.
At least the actual science behind it, people's interpretations of that science, on the other hand, can be all over the place, at times.
Humans use 10% of their brain they say but when the 3rd eye awakens they can use 100% you will get smarter.
That "10% brain usage" myth is really an undying one. If all 100%, all 100 billion of our neurons would start firing all at the same time, we'd simply have a seizure and die.
There are lots of people around who's brain activity is above those, what we would call, "sustainable levels", because there's neurological condition called epilepsy. They don't get smarter when they get too many neurons firing at the same time, on contrary - their ability to function as a human being gets impaired, unfortunately.

Or as scientists put it:
Neurologist Barry Gordon describes the myth as false, adding, "we use virtually every part of the brain, and that (most of) the brain is active almost all the time." Neuroscientist Barry Beyerstein sets out six kinds of evidence refuting the ten percent myth:

1. Studies of brain damage: If 10 percent of the brain is normally used, then damage to other areas should not impair performance. Instead, there is almost no area of the brain that can be damaged without loss of abilities. Even slight damage to small areas of the brain can have profound effects.
2. Brain scans have shown that no matter what one is doing, all brain areas are always active. Some areas are more active at any one time than others, but barring brain damage, there is no part of the brain that is absolutely not functioning. Technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allow the activity of the living brain to be monitored. They reveal that even during sleep, all parts of the brain show some level of activity. Only in the case of serious damage does a brain have "silent" areas.
3. The brain is enormously costly to the rest of the body, in terms of oxygen and nutrient consumption. It can require up to 20 percent of the body's energy—more than any other organ—despite making up only 2 percent of the human body weight. If 90 percent of it were unnecessary, there would be a large survival advantage to humans with smaller, more efficient brains. If this were true, the process of natural selection would have eliminated the inefficient brain portions. It is also highly unlikely that a brain with so much redundant matter would have evolved in the first place; given the historical risk of death in childbirth associated with the large brain size (and therefore skull size) of humans, there would be a strong selection pressure against such a large brain size if only 10 percent was actually in use.
4. Localization of function: Rather than acting as a single mass, the brain has distinct regions for different kinds of information processing. Decades of research have gone into mapping functions onto areas of the brain, and no function-less areas have been found.
5. Microstructural analysis: In the single-unit recording technique, researchers insert a tiny electrode into the brain to monitor the activity of a single cell. If 90 percent of cells were unused, then this technique would have revealed that.
6. Synaptic pruning: Brain cells that are not used have a tendency to degenerate. Hence if 90 percent of the brain were inactive, autopsy of normal adult brains would reveal large-scale degeneration.

In debunking the ten percent myth, Knowing Neurons editor Gabrielle-Ann Torre writes that using one hundred percent of one's brain would not be desirable either. Such unfettered activity would almost certainly trigger an epileptic seizure. Torre writes that, even at rest, a person likely uses as much of his or her brain as reasonably possible through the default mode network, a widespread brain network that is active and synchronized even in the absence of any cognitive task. Thus, "large portions of the brain are never truly dormant, as the 10% myth might otherwise suggest."
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Cerber wrote: Sat Jul 23, 2022 8:29 pm
I'm on the opposite camp. In my books, 99% of it is more or less accurate, the remaining 1% is a work in progress.
At least the actual science behind it, people's interpretations of that science, on the other hand, can be all over the place, at times.
You probably believe louis pasteur(founder of virus theory) was a genius and viruses are real. But even on his deathbed he said he was wrong about everything. He instructed his son to release his work after his sons death. we didnt get his work to almost 150yrs later. in 1997 ish. People of harvard took a look at it and deemed it a bunch of crap. A lot of basic procedures to prove the authenticity of his work were never done even tho it would have been easy to do.

Viruses dont exist. Back in the day the powers that be would say you are possessed by demons to spread invisible fear and kill whoever they please. Modern people dont believe in demons so they needed a new invisible threat aka viruses. When you catch the flu in winter its not from viruses. Instead because of the cold weather people close their windows and doors trapping all the highly poisonous and numerous toxins we exhale in the house. This poisons them and they get sick. Also known as the breath of death in ancient times.

They did a experiment and put a bird under a glass bell with enough oxygen to survive 3 hrs. They took it out on the 2nd hour and put a new bird in. The 2nd bird died instantly. This shows you how poisonous the toxic gasses we exhale are. It also shows you that life is very good at adapting. Aslong as its a slow progression of getting healthy or unhealthy then you wont die. If you get healthy or unhealthy too quickly you will die. I could go on and on debunking just about every little thing of biology but would take too long just go read hilton hotema books and the books he reccomends.

Vaccines are what kills you. The powers that be needed a way to reduce to population before starting their big takeovers. I have the ingredients in the covid vaccine and its 90% straight poison. Theres even a whistleblower that works with it in a lab. She shows people a alien metal lifeform inside of it that crawled right out of the lab dish. I believe this is some techno human interface used for identification nanomachines or something. The video is legit but even if the lifeform is fake the rest of it is all poison.

The powers that be control all the media. It was one of the first things they bought out. By controlling what people see they thought they can control what they believe. So they pedalstalize(blast their name all over the media saying they are right) false scientists to lead people away from the truth. If people knew how easy it was to cure all disease they wouldnt make much money and there would be too many people for them to control. Do you really believe you are taught the truth? looool goodluck

You might be wondering why the powers that be are soo evil. Well thats because 99.9999 of humans dont have free will. The only poeple that have free will are the people that know who they truelly are and where that will comes from. Imo you also need to know creation and destruction laws. For example if your in a desert dying of thirst and find a muddy puddle of water you will be extremely grateful cuz its saving your life. Suffering = gratefulness/love/creation. Vice versa if you have water, wine, ambrosia ect you tasted the best the world has to offer then water is bland too you and sucks. Bliss/paradise/satiated desire = Ungratefulness, hate, perversion, destruction. So if your nature is based on your environment and your choices are based on your nature then free will dont exist. Btw your will is your soul and comes from the cosmic will so you are really a piece of god.
Last edited by Flowing Hands on Sun Jul 24, 2022 10:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Flowing Hands wrote: Sun Jul 24, 2022 10:23 pm Viruses dont exist....
Vaccines are what kills you. ...
Not in my personal experience. Not even gonna talk about any other vaccines, but when it comes the most recent one, then two shots of vaccine didn't even made me sneeze once. On the other hand, the virus itself (before I got vaccination, before there were any vaccines) nearly put me in the ground. I was suffocating, drowning in my own bodily fluids in my own bed, for over a week.
So.. I don't judge too harshly the way others lead their lives, but my own family is taking their shots and we all are still alive and very well.
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Cerber thats because you are very lucky. Your family is smart and lives very healthy. Or you are all so very unhealthy fill with so much poison that a little more poison wont have much of a affect. Its tricky imo who will die and who wont. Good genes idk

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Flowing Hands wrote: Sun Jul 24, 2022 10:23 pm stuff
The problem with conspiracy theories, is that the 'majority' of them are made up by the perpetrators of conspiracies.
The technique is called "poisoning the well".

Let us say that a group of people conspire to do something which would be troubling if it were widely known.
Let us also say, that they are unable to perform their action, without leaving at least some clues behind.
In the absence of any further variables, they will eventually be caught out.

But what if there are further variables?
One conspirator whispers in the ear of one group a tale of false clues.
Another conspirator whispers in the ear of another group a tale of other false clues.
And still another conspirator whispers in the ear of still another group a tale which can be disproven.
And another whispering in the ear of still further people a tale which is blatantly false and easily disproven.
And then one last conspirator spends his time helping to create attention on that last group, where the blatantly and easily falsifiable set of ideas are seeded.

Then all that remains, is to lump these people together. To conflate one group with the other in the broad public opinion.

And voila... the truth becomes a needle in a haystack of nonsense.

But remember this. The bulk of those who are speaking out against the conspirators, ARE conspirators, building flimsy straw men to be easily struck down.



...you don't need to make a case to re-write all of modern medical science, just to harbor distrust for people who have proven not to be trustworthy.
Don't be eager to perpetuate the words from the whisperers of straw men, the well poisoners, the eaters of truth, selling truths on a silver platter.
Or more simply put, don't trample the crime scene at the suggestion of the culprit.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_INFEKTION
Some say, it only took few decades and few million Rubles to convince half of the Americans their own government is actively trying to kill them, and thus crippling nation's trust in their own leadership, permanently, and in turn cultivating land for all future "truths". KGB never ceased to exist, it only re-branded.
But then again, others might say that's just another conspiracy theory, or a coverup by from CIA space-lizards division. These days only twitter and facebook experts always seem to know exactly whats going on in the world.
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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Elder Futhark is one of the first magical systems that I learned. Fun stuff.....very intense vibe. May make a post on the topic in the future.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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WildWolf wrote: Sat Feb 25, 2023 9:58 pm Elder Futhark is one of the first magical systems that I learned. Fun stuff.....very intense vibe. May make a post on the topic in the future.
Elder Futhark is one of the magical systems I have learned too.

Sounds fun to hear that there are also the version or the runes that are much "younger" and from different origins. The "younger" ones aren't even from the Futhark / Odinist alphabet and Nordic aspect surprisingly.

Magic has a lot of diversity.
The best you can do to raise stars is to evolve to be as high as them - Hermes

ᛖᚷᛟ ᛊᚢᛗ ᛈᚨcᛟ -ego sum paco - I'm in peace
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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

Post by WildWolf »

BlackOrbit666 wrote: Wed May 10, 2023 12:59 pm
WildWolf wrote: Sat Feb 25, 2023 9:58 pm Elder Futhark is one of the first magical systems that I learned. Fun stuff.....very intense vibe. May make a post on the topic in the future.
Elder Futhark is one of the magical systems I have learned too.

Sounds fun to hear that there are also the version or the runes that are much "younger" and from different origins. The "younger" ones aren't even from the Futhark / Odinist alphabet and Nordic aspect surprisingly.

Magic has a lot of diversity.
As society changes and tech advances....the forces that society needs to engage with, shifts as well.

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Re: Anyone else dig into ancient or cross-cultural systems?

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WildWolf wrote: Wed May 10, 2023 2:57 pm
BlackOrbit666 wrote: Wed May 10, 2023 12:59 pm
WildWolf wrote: Sat Feb 25, 2023 9:58 pm Elder Futhark is one of the first magical systems that I learned. Fun stuff.....very intense vibe. May make a post on the topic in the future.
Elder Futhark is one of the magical systems I have learned too.

Sounds fun to hear that there are also the version or the runes that are much "younger" and from different origins. The "younger" ones aren't even from the Futhark / Odinist alphabet and Nordic aspect surprisingly.

Magic has a lot of diversity.
As society changes and tech advances....the forces that society needs to engage with, shifts as well.
True! I agree with your statement.
The best you can do to raise stars is to evolve to be as high as them - Hermes

ᛖᚷᛟ ᛊᚢᛗ ᛈᚨcᛟ -ego sum paco - I'm in peace
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